On July 27, 2017, a miner was fatally injured when his light-duty truck was run over by a haul truck. The victim was pronounced dead at the scene.

Best Practices

  •  Do not park smaller vehicles in a large truck’s potential path of movement.• Before moving mobile equipment, be certain no one is in the intended path; sound the horn to warn possible unseen persons; and wait to give them time to move to a safe location.
  • Ensure all persons are trained to recognize workplace hazards – specifically, the limited visibility and blind areas inherent to operation of large equipment and the hazard of mobile equipment traveling near them.
  • Establish procedures that require smaller vehicles to maintain a safe distance from large mobile equipment until eye contact is made or approval to move closer is obtained from the mobile equipment operator. Provide training on these procedures.
  • Install cameras and collision avoidance systems on large trucks to protect persons.
  • Regularly monitor work practices and reinforce their importance. Take immediate action to correct unsafe conditions or work practices.

Click here for: MSHA Preliminary Report (pdf)

m04On April 9, 2016, a 25-year old plant operator with 4 years of mining experience was fatally injured at a surface copper ore mine. He was found unresponsive, kneeling with his face against a stainless steel flange that was connected to a high-density polyethylene pipe. The victim appeared to have received an electrical shock.

Best Practices

  • Establish and discuss safe work procedures that include hazard analysis before beginning work. Identify and control all hazards associated with the work to be performed and use methods to properly protect persons.
  • Train all persons to understand the hazards associated with working near energized electrical conductors.
  • Use properly rated Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) including Arc Flash Protection such as a hood, gloves, shirt, and pants.
  • Ensure that all electrical systems are safely designed and properly installed and that all metal enclosing or encasing electrical circuits are grounded or provided with equivalent protection.
  • Provide equipment grounding conductors, with a sufficiently low impedance to limit the voltage to ground, for metal enclosures.  Use a properly rated meter to identify any stray electrical currents which may be present.
  • Lock Out, Tag Out, and Try: Place your lock and tag on the disconnecting device and test for power.

Click here for: MSHA Preliminary Report (pdf), MSHA Investigation Report (pdf), Overview (pdf).

ftl2013m04On April 4, 2013, a 30-year old general foreman with 6 years of experience was killed at a copper ore operation. An excavator was being used to position a 36-inch diameter by 40-foot long section of pipe to connect it to another section of pipe. The pipe, attached to the excavator by a lifting strap, shifted and fell on the victim.

Best Practices

  • Establish and discuss safe work procedures. Identify and control all hazards associated with the work to be performed along with the methods to properly protect persons.
  • Task train all persons to recognize all potential hazardous conditions and to understand safe job procedures for elimination of the hazards before beginning work.
  • Attach taglines to loads that may require steadying or guidance while suspended.
  • Securely block equipment against hazardous motion to ensure energy cannot be released while performing work.
  • Never work in the fall path of objects/materials of massive weights having the potential of becoming off-balanced while in a raised position.
  • Implement measures to ensure persons are properly positioned and protected from hazards while performing a task.
  • Monitor personnel routinely to determine that safe work procedures are followed.

Click here for: MSHA Preliminary Report (pdf), MSHA Investigation Report (pdf), Overview (powerpoint), Overview (pdf).

On September 22, 2012, a 34-year old contract laborer with 6 days of experience was killed when he fell through a 6 ft. X 8 ft. hole that was partially covered with 2″ X 4″ boards and ¾ ” thick plywood. He fell into a chute landing on a belt conveyor 30 feet below. The victim was assigned fire watch duties on a welding/cutting operation that was taking place on the floor above him.

Best Practices
 

  • Establish and discuss safe work procedures. Identify and control all hazards. Train all persons to recognize and understand safe job procedures before beginning work.
  • Always use fall protection when working where a fall hazard exists.
  • Protect openings near travelways through which persons may fall by installing appropriately designed railings, barriers, or covers.
  • Keep temporary access opening covers secured in place at all times when the opening is not being used. Replace deteriorated floor plating and grating.
  • Ensure that areas are barricaded or have warning signs posted at all approaches if hazards exist that are not immediately obvious.

Click here for: MSHA Preliminary Report (pdf), MSHA Investigation Report (pdf), Overview (powerpoint), Overview (pdf).

On June 20, 2010, a 52 year-old mechanic with 8 years of experience was fatally injured at a surface copper operation. A ½ ton pickup truck had parked in front of a 240 ton haul truck that was also parked. The haul truck pulled forward and struck the pickup truck fatally injuring the driver and seriously injuring another miner.

Best Practices

  • Do not park smaller vehicles in a large truck’s potential path of movement.
  • Before moving mobile equipment, be certain no one is in the intended path, sound the horn to warn possible unseen persons, and wait to give them time to move to a safe location.
  • Ensure all persons are trained to recognize work place hazards, specifically the limited visibility and blind areas inherent to operation of large equipment and the hazard of mobile equipment traveling near them.
  • Establish procedures that require smaller vehicles to maintain a safe distance from large mobile equipment until eye contact is made or approval to move closer is obtained from the mobile equipment operator. Provide training in these procedures.
  • Install cameras and collision avoidance systems on large trucks to protect persons.
  • Regularly monitor work practices and reinforce the importance of them. Take immediate action to correct unsafe conditions or work practices.

Click here for: MSHA Preliminary Report (pdf), MSHA Investigation Report (pdf), Overview(powerpoint), Overview(pdf), Spanish Fatalgram (pdf)

On January 9, 2010, a 20 year-old contractor laborer with 21 weeks of experience was fatally injured at a copper operation. Two track excavators were being used to place a 400-foot long section of 24-inch diameter plastic pipe into a pond. To facilitate the installation process, the pipe was placed on top of an adjacent section of pipe that was previously placed on the plastic lining of the pond. During installation, the pipe being installed misaligned and the victim and two coworkers attempted to remove the end of this pipe from the top of the existing pipe. At that time, the end of the pipe shifted, hit a coworker, and then struck the victim. The victim fell to the ground and the pipe landed on him. The coworker was not injured.

Best Practices

  • Task train all persons prior to performing any work.
  • Always stay clear of suspended loads.
  • Use taglines of sufficient length to adequately protect persons from potential hazards.

Click here for: MSHA Investigation Report(pdf), Overview(powerpoint), Overview(pdf), Spanish Fatalgram(doc)

On September 27, 2009, a 28 year-old truck driver with 2 years of experience was fatally injured at a copper operation. He was operating a 240-ton haul truck that left the haul road and climbed a berm, causing it to overturn and land on the haul road. The victim, who was not wearing a seat belt, fell from the cab of the truck.

Best Practices

  • Always wear a seat belt when operating a haul truck or mobile equipment.
  • Monitor employees regularly to ensure seat belts are worn when operating mobile equipment.
  • Maintain control and stay alert when operating mobile equipment.
  • Conduct pre-operational checks to identify and correct any defects that may affect the safe operation of self-propelled mobile equipment.

Click here for: MSHA Investigation Report(pdf), Overview(powerpoint), Overview(pdf)