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https://www.osha.gov/StopFallsStandDown/index.html

On February 27, 2017, a 43-year-old plant attendant, with approximately 13 years of experience, was fatally injured when he fell through a 27-inch opening in a plate press.  The victim had climbed a ladder to repair a damaged plate when he fell about 19 feet onto a moving refuse belt.  The victim was found in a transfer chute, approximately 55 feet down the belt from where he had fallen.

Best Practices

  • Provide and maintain safe access to all work areas.  Train miners on how to safely access all work areas.
  • Protect and guard all openings through which persons may fall.  Use fall protection, maintaining 100 % tie off, when fall hazards exist.  See Fall Prevention Safety Target Package.
  • Establish specific policies and procedures for the use of fall protection.
  • Ensure workers are trained in the use of fall protection.  Monitor work practices to ensure fall protection is being properly used.
  • Conduct a risk assessment of the work area prior to beginning any task and identify all possible hazards.  Use the SLAM: Stop, Look, Analyze, and Manage approach for work place safety.

Click here for: MSHA Preliminary Report (pdf)

dec-21-2016A miner was trying to determine why clay was not flowing properly by examining a chute that discharged into a screw conveyor. Instead of using a ladder to look inside, he stood on top of the metal screw conveyor cover his foot slipped and he fell approximately three feet to the grating floor hitting his head and suffered serious injuries.

BEST PRACTICES 

  • Identify all potential tripping and falling hazards before working.
  • Look for fall hazards such as unprotected floor openings or edges, shafts, skylights, stairwells, and roof openings.
  • Select, wear, and use the appropriate fall protection equipment for the task.
  • Provide and use appropriate lighting in work areas after dark.
  • Use appropriate ladder for job task.

Download MSHA Alert HERE.

m14On September 15, 2016, a 60 year old Mechanic, with 28 years of experience, was fatally injured at a Magnesite facility. The victim was seriously injured when he fell while dismounting a front end loader. The victim was hospitalized and died on September 26, 2016.

Best Practices

  • Always use the “Three Points of Contact” method. Use either two hands and one foot, or one hand and two feet when mounting and dismounting equipment.
  • Keep hands free of any objects when making three points of contact.
  • Maintain traction by ensuring footwear is free of potential hazards such as dirt, oil, and grease.  Slip resistant material can be coated to existing foot holds and handrails.
  • Use hoisting materials to transport tools and other objects that may keep hands from being free.
  • Inspect contact areas for slip or trip hazards.
  • Ensure steps and handrails are properly secured and free of defects and debris and always face equipment when mounting or dismounting it.
  • Ensure landing areas are equipped with adequate lighting.

Click here for: MSHA Preliminary Report (pdf), MSHA Investigation Report (pdf), Overview (pdf).

m06On May 10, 2016, a 46-year old maintenance man with 6 years of experience was fatally injured at a cement plant. The victim went to the top of the slurry tank to start the rake system. He fell 50 feet through a 3-foot by 4-foot opening in the walkway into the empty slurry tank below.

Best Practices

  • Protect openings near travelways by installing railings, barriers, or covers.
  • Ensure covers or railings protecting temporary access openings are secured in place at all times when an opening is not being used.
  • Provide readily visible warning signs that clearly display the nature of the hazard and any protective action required.
  • Wear fall protection where there is a danger of falling.
  • Establish and discuss safe work procedures. Identify and control all hazards to finish the job safely.
  • Train all persons, especially workplace examiners, to recognize and understand safe job procedures before beginning work. Communicate and correct hazards in a timely manner.

Click here for: MSHA Preliminary Report (pdf), MSHA Investigation Report (pdf), Overview (pdf).

m11On May 18, 2015, a 59-year old delivery truck driver with 32 years of experience was killed at a cement plant.  The victim arrived at the plant to deliver drums. After opening the trailer doors, the driver walked to the cab of his truck and proceeded to climb the steps to get back in the cab when he fell backwards onto the ground striking the back of his head.

Best Practices

  • Always use the “Three Points of Contact” method. Ensure that either two hands and one foot, or one hand and two feet are in contact with the ladder at all times when mounting and dismounting equipment.
  • Equipment should be designed to minimize the height of the first step from the ground and be provided with hand-holds to facilitate  “Three Points of Contact”
  • Keep hands free of any objects when mounting or dismounting equipment.
  • Maintain traction by ensuring footwear is free of potential slipping hazards such as dirt, oil, and grease. Slip resistant material can be coated to existing foot holds and handrails.
  • Always face equipment when mounting or dismounting it.
  • Always maintain and use the access provided by the manufacturer.

Click here for: MSHA Preliminary Report (pdf), MSHA Investigation Report (pdf), Overview (pdf).

m27On June 14, 2014, Kevin Lee Ames, a 35-year-old laborer, was using a propane torch to shrink-wrap pelletized gypsum when he received serious burns on 35% of his body. He was subsequently discovered by a co-worker and transported to a hospital. He died on July 28, 2014. The death certificate indicated that the cause of death was mucormycosis (fungal infection) due to burns, and that the manner of death was an accident. An autopsy was not performed. Based on the findings of the death certificate and the MSHA investigation, the Fatality Review Committee determined that the death should be charged to the mining industry.

[SafeMiners.com note: We’re posting these much later, catching up from late notice and even later pictures from MSHA for the reasons noted above.]

Click here for: MSHA Preliminary Report (pdf), MSHA Investigation Report (pdf).

m20aOn October 10, 2014, a 66-year-old contract truck driver with approximately 11 years of experience was killed at a cement operation.  The driver was inside a loading rack closing the hatch on top of a bulk tanker truck.  When the victim raised the rack to access the hatch, he fell between the rack and rounded side of the truck and then fell to the ground.

Best Practices

  • Establish traffic patterns to ensure safe alignment of vehicles with access equipment.
  • Identify and control all hazards associated with the work to be performed and use methods to properly protect persons.
  • Ensure that persons are trained, including task-training, to address the hazards associated with the work being performed.
  • Always use fall protection when working where a fall hazard exists.
  • Always be aware of your surroundings and any hazards that may be present.

Click here for: MSHA Preliminary Report (pdf)

m18On August 25, 2014, a 54-year-old truck driver with 1 year of experience was killed at a limestone mine.  The victim went to a storage building to get some wooden planks.  He climbed a stack of loaded pallets to get to the planks that were near the rafters and fell approximately 8 feet to the ground below.  The next day two coworkers arrived at the mine and found the victim at approximately 6:05 a.m.

Best Practices

  • Establish and discuss safe work procedures before beginning work. Identify and control all hazards associated with the work to be performed and use methods to properly protect persons.
  • Ensure that persons are trained, including task-training, to understand the hazards associated with the work being performed.
  • Develop a plan to store supplies and other items in an accessible way to ensure ease of retrieval and transportation.
  • Always be aware of your surroundings and any hazards that may be present.
  • Provide and maintain a safe means of access to all working places.  Always work from a stable position.
  • Do not assign a person to work alone in areas where hazardous conditions exist that would endanger his or her safety.
  • Account for all persons at the end of each shift.

Click here for: MSHA Preliminary Report (pdf)